How Shell destroys livelihoods in Nigeria’s Niger Delta

Compiled by Atâyi Babs

Bodo campaign poster, the text says: "Oil pollution in the Niger Delta destroys livelihoods" "Shell. Own up. Pay up. Clean up." Image is of Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei showing the damage done to his fish farm in Bodo, Nigeria, May 2011. The farm flourished before the August 2008 oil spill, but the pollution destroyed his fish farm, leaving him and his workers without a regular income. Bodo, Nigeria, May 2011. (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
Bodo campaign poster, the text says:
“Oil pollution in the Niger Delta destroys livelihoods”
“Shell. Own up. Pay up. Clean up.”
Image is of Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei showing the damage done to his fish farm in Bodo, Nigeria, May 2011. The farm flourished before the August 2008 oil spill, but the pollution destroyed his fish farm, leaving him and his workers without a regular income. Bodo, Nigeria, May 2011. (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei contemplates the damage done to his fish farm in Bodo, Nigeria, May 2011. The farm flourished before the August 2008 oil spill, but the pollution destroyed his fish farm, leaving him and his workers without a regular income. Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei used to be a fish farmer in Bodo. The Shell oil spill of August 2008 destroyed his fish farm. As a result of which he has had to move to a single room apartment with his family, he can no longer send his youngest child to school and has no regular source of income anymore. His fish farm provided a living for about thirty families. (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei contemplates the damage done to his fish farm in Bodo, Nigeria, May 2011. The farm flourished before the August 2008 oil spill, but the pollution destroyed his fish farm, leaving him and his workers without a regular income. Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei used to be a fish farmer in Bodo. The Shell oil spill of August 2008 destroyed his fish farm. As a result of which he has had to move to a single room apartment with his family, he can no longer send his youngest child to school and has no regular source of income anymore. His fish farm provided a living for about thirty families. (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
Dead Periwinkles covered in oily mud from Bodo creek, Nigeria, May 2011. (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
Dead Periwinkles covered in oily mud from Bodo creek, Nigeria, May 2011. (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
The oil spill in Bodo, October 2008. Independent experts estimate that more than 4,000 barrels of oil were spilled every day before the pipe was clamped. The oil killed much of the fish and shellfish in the creek. (PHOTO: CEHRD)
The oil spill in Bodo, October 2008.
Independent experts estimate that more than 4,000 barrels of oil were spilled every day before the pipe was clamped. The oil killed much of the fish and shellfish in the creek. (PHOTO: CEHRD)
Shell workers arriving to clamp the broken pipeline, Bodo, 7 November 2008.  This still image taken from the film shot by local NGO, Centre for Environment, Human Rights and Development (CEHRD).  On 28 August 2008 a fault in the Trans-Niger pipeline resulted in a significant oil spill into Bodo Creek in Ogoniland. The oil poured into the swamp and creek for weeks, covering the area in a thick slick of oil and killing the fish that people depend on for food and for their livelihood. Thousands of barrels of oil spouted out of the broken pipeline for 10 weeks before Shell finally clamped it on 7 November 2008.  According to Shell, a total of 1,640 barrels of oil were spilled during the first spill. An independent assessment suggests that some 4,000 barrels poured out every day. (PHOTO: CEHRD)
Shell workers arriving to clamp the broken pipeline, Bodo, 7 November 2008.
This still image taken from the film shot by local NGO, Centre for Environment, Human Rights and Development (CEHRD).
On 28 August 2008 a fault in the Trans-Niger pipeline resulted in a significant oil spill into Bodo Creek in Ogoniland. The oil poured into the swamp and creek for weeks, covering the area in a thick slick of oil and killing the fish that people depend on for food and for their livelihood.
Thousands of barrels of oil spouted out of the broken pipeline for 10 weeks before Shell finally clamped it on 7 November 2008.
According to Shell, a total of 1,640 barrels of oil were spilled during the first spill. An independent assessment suggests that some 4,000 barrels poured out every day. (PHOTO: CEHRD)

 

Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei's hand covered in oily mud, Bodo Creek, Nigeria, (PHOTO: Amnesty Internationla
Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei’s hand covered in oily mud, Bodo Creek, Nigeria, (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei walks through his ruined fish farm in Bodo, Nigeria, May 2011. The farm flourished before the August 2008 oil spill, but the pollution destroyed his fish farm, leaving him and his workers without a regular income.  (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei walks through his ruined fish farm in Bodo, Nigeria, May 2011. The farm flourished before the August 2008 oil spill, but the pollution destroyed his fish farm, leaving him and his workers without a regular income. (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
Cecilia Teela searching the oil-covered shore of Bodo creek, where she used to collect periwrinkles, Nigeria, May 2011. Today, she has to travel to a neighbouring state to make a living. Celicia and Emmanuel are married and have a daughter and son. Emmanuel is a fisherman. Cecilia collected shell fish. Because of the Shell oil spill of 2008, they now have to go much further to be able to fish. It means that they can't catch as much fish as they used to. (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
Cecilia Teela searching the oil-covered shore of Bodo creek, where she used to collect periwrinkles, Nigeria, May 2011. Today, she has to travel to a neighbouring state to make a living.
Celicia and Emmanuel are married and have a daughter and son. Emmanuel is a fisherman. Cecilia collected shell fish. Because of the Shell oil spill of 2008, they now have to go much further to be able to fish. It means that they can’t catch as much fish as they used to. (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
In 2008, the Bodo community, in the Niger Delta, was devastated by two massive oil spills from a Shell pipeline. In January 2015, Shell agreed to pay £55 million in compensation to the community. However, the pollution has still not been cleaned up.  Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei is a fish farmer from Bodo whose fish ponds were destroyed by the pollution. (PHOTO: Amnesty International)
In 2008, the Bodo community, in the Niger Delta, was devastated by two massive oil spills from a Shell pipeline. In January 2015, Shell agreed to pay £55 million in compensation to the community. However, the pollution has still not been cleaned up. Pastor Christian Lekoya Kpandei is a fish farmer from Bodo whose fish ponds were destroyed by the pollution.                 (PHOTO: Amnesty International)

 

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1 COMMENT

  1. Don’t know where to start,so so sad! Haven spent 25yrs in Warri I can’t but feel this pain. Something must be done abd urgently, things can’t continue like this!!

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